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Day 157 — You’re Caller, No. 3

Life's DelaysAs I stepped onto the subway platform at the Bethesda Metro stop, I glanced up to read the screen that displays arrival and departure information.

“Expect delays…to Glenmont.” I walked to my spot and waited for my train to arrive.

And then it hit me. Delays. Life is a continual cycle of delays, involving deliveries, accidents, checkout lines, restaurants  and the like.

While delays like these are unforeseen but not unexpected, they are unwelcome. Other delays, however, are planned. We might delay marriage to finish school or delay the birth of a child.

Most delays cause us to huff and puff. But they soon become fleeting memories. After all, we’re not inconvenienced by them for very long. As parents tell their kids when there’s no more chocolate milk, “It’s no big deal.”

For other delays, such as the loss of a job, we used to expect to turnaround our unemployment status within about three months. But no one thinks that anymore, and the statistics don’t support it.

The average length of official unemployment has increased to 24.5 weeks, the longest since government began tracking this data in 1948, which was during the Truman administration. The number of long-term unemployed (i.e., for 27 weeks or more) has now jumped to 4.4 million, an all-time high.

When Americans do regain a modicum of financial footing, they will be faced with other, more daunting delays that they won’t be able to wick away.

Many will be forced to delay their retirement. They will be overburdened with debt and the loss of joy in their lives.

It’s too bad that the Obama administration didn’t get it right and that the trillions of dollars allocated to this nation’s economic recovery fed the corporate wallets of Wall Street instead of the pockets of the average American, which got the now-extinct “cash for clunkers” program.

That, my friend, is a big deal.

As I stepped onto the subway platform at the Bethesda Metro stop, I
glanced up to read the screen that displays arrival and departure
information.

“Expect delays…to Glenmont.” I walked to my spot and waited for my
train to arrive.

And then it hit me. Delays. Life is a continual cycle of delays,
involving deliveries, accidents, checkout lines, restaurant  and the
like.

While delays like these are unforeseen but not unexpected, other
delays are planned. We might delay marriage to finish school or delay
the birth of a child.

For most delays we huff and puff, because the time of inconvenience is
typically a few hours before we return to our normal course of life.

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One Response to “Day 157 — You’re Caller, No. 3”

  1. I love how you talk about delaying retirement. I used to have retirement savings. I have been living on my IRA since January. It will last until December. After that I am going to move to Manassas and ask my son in law for a job bagging groceries at his store.

    As far as retirement goes my new retirement plan is two paramedics and a black plastic bag. Thats all thats left. I’m OK with that. I never really wanted to retire anyway. Maybe I should run for congress. My life would be set then and I’d have free health care for life and a big fat retirement carried on the backs of entrepreneurs, those evil rich bastards who have laid everyone off.

    Oh that’s right I am one. Ha! Who would have thought I’d be in this position? Certainly not me. But like many of you here I am, working from one day to the next trying to figure out what the next step will be. I refuse to give up. I will not just lay down and wait to die. I’m not wired that way. I will pick myself up every morning and try to make something new to do, some way to restructure my business to make money again. Additionally I will network and make new opportunities to build my business back up again. Don’t give up!

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